“Everywhere, and in almost every way conceivable.”

Benjamin B. Warfield (1851–1921) was an ardent defender of the Westminster Confession, and especially of the authority and inspiration of Scripture. His works were paramount in the corpus of Protestant theology, and most Christians who view themselves as Reformed hold to the tenants he laid out.

When the Christian asserts his faith in the divine origin of his Bible, he does not mean to deny that it was composed and written by men or that it was given by men to the world. He believes that the marks of its human origin are ineradicably stamped on every page of the whole volume. He means to state only that it is not merely human in its origin. If asked where and how the divine has entered this divine-human book, he must reply: “Everywhere, and in almost every way conceivable.” Throughout the whole preparation of the material to be written and of the men to write it; throughout the whole process of the gathering and classification and use of the material by the writers; throughout the whole process of the actual writing,—he sees at work divine influences of the most varied kinds, extending all the way from simply providential superintendence and spiritual illumination to direct revelation and inspiration.

Benjamin B. Warfield, Revelation and Inspiration (p. 429)

Revelation and Inspiration is Logos’ Free Book of the Month. Visit Logos.com/free and get it yourself — it’s worth the read!

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